2014 Student Television Network Convention – Orlando, Fla.

STN2

The 2014 Student Television Network Convention was held in Orlando, Fla. at the Rosen Plaza Hotel and Orange County Convention Center from March 20-23. Thirteen KCBY staff members and adviser Irma Kennedy attended the national convention and competition. Photo by Chase Wofford

Here’s a recap from the 2014 Student Television Network Convention at the Rosen Plaza Hotel and Orange County Convention Center from March 20-23 in Orlando, Fla.

FRIDAY – March 21
Super Session-
Student of the Year – Cameron Quon
Miss the sweet 16 deadline and you never miss a deadline again
Teamwork – schools that come on stage to collect awards come together as a unit
Be understanding of your friends
Find the  hidden talents and work together to bring them out
Humility – be humble and teachable
Motivation – keep goal at the forefront
Make the most of the opportunities presented to you
STN president Doug Green
– student created piece for local NBC station on distracted driving
– $16K raised for local food bank
– operated a telethon to keep camp for kids with cancer
– Immigrant students in Florida about adjusting to their new life
– film exposing truths about military medical care
– film promoting peace and tolerance
– film about dangers of driving while tired and number of fatalities
Keynote – Andrew Jenks
Andrew Jenks, Room 335
Spent over 30 days in Florida nursing home; 19 years old
Returned to parents basement to edit
Film was rejected over and over
Finally started getting into film festivals and finally started winning
Sophomore year gets call from HBO – wanted to buy his movie. Living in dorm room at the time
Hired entertainment lawyer and sold the film
MTV “World of Jenks”
Moved in with a rapper for show
Shot over 200 hours of footage for 5 minute scissor roll he didn’t expect MTV to pick up; thought he would use it for documentary
MTV wanted to come to his office and see his operation- he didn’t have an office or opera ration. Lived in apartment with 3 roommates
20 minutes of a meeting with MTV executives in his bedroom led to 2 seasons of his show and 8 million viewers
Footage shot on iPhone – nobody has ever said “did you shoot on an iPhone?”
All-American High School Film a Festival in New York
Students from around the country work in the Student Television Network Convention Sweet 16 contest editing room on Thursday, March 20 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla.

Students from around the country work in the Student Television Network Convention Sweet 16 contest editing room on Thursday, March 20 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. Photo by Chase Wofford

2:15 session: Wide, Medium, Tight, Super Tight
Sequence allows you to transport the viewer to your story. It brings your story to life
Wide, medium, tight, super tight them change scenes
Any detail to allude to a moment and then switch to different scene
Establishing shot (opening of segment) – ice fishing story
Have enough variety in shots – left, middle, right. Move the eye in circular fashion
Think of how many angle you can shoot as the ice fisherman drills holes
Next story: man with his dog at lake on hot day in Minnesota. Action shots of throwing toy into the water; many different wide/tight shots
Get a ton of tight shots – the transitional meat of your story. They can get you out of any jams
Wide shots establish “here we are” for the story
Story  about man driving truck plowing the snow off the roads: in all shots the truck is driving the same direction. Screen direction left to right
Super wide shot of frozen lake – establishes the scene, a cold, frigid, desolate frozen lake
Bible running story: super tight shots for transitions (runner going from inside to outside)
Ice lake house story: remember what you are shooting has sound. That’s the soundtrack to your story (snow shovel shoveling ice and snow)
Change the elevation of your shooting (ground level and up, on tripod and off)
Don’t be afraid to be close to people as you film
Each shot is about 4 secs long but the speed of the action determines the pacing of the edits
Kid church organ player prodigy story: boy’s last name is Hell
Crew arrives at story and all that is there is the boy in am empty church playing an organ. Even if you show up for a story and all that is happening is a meeting, use wide, medium, tight, super tight and just notice what’s happening around you. You have to still tell a story
KC Chiefs super fan story: god example of thinking outside of the box and having fun with the story
With a news story, you can’t tell the people what to do. You have to anticipate what is happening next and always be ready
Grave marker story of child who died 90 years ago and finally got a grave marker: everything happened really fast
Shots of getting into car, doors opening/closing, getting items out of trunk
To get close, zoom with your feet and run up there, not with your camera from a far on your tripod
Get low to get a steady shot
Anticipate and be ready for the next thing to happen
Gettysburg story: PA bull riders
Came across a guy upon arrival talking about playing bull poker. Followed the guy throughout the story. Gets nailed by the charging bulls during game
Shot 90 minutes of tape in about 4 hours for story to air that night at 10 pm
Find the story once you arrive, not in advance. And the story can always change
Keep a constant dialogue with your team. “Is there something you want to write about that I don’t have a picture of?”
Example of things changing: state trooper story when he pull over woman with a gun. Example of being prepared to expect the unexpected
Senior Hamin Kim directs and films a scene in KCBY's Sweet 16 film entry at the Student Television Network Convention in Orlando, Fla. on Thursday. Thirteen KCBY staff members and adviser Irma Kennedy are in Orlando for the convention, which runs through Sunday, at the Rosen Plaza Hotel and Orange County Convention Center.

Senior Hamin Kim directs and films a scene in KCBY’s Sweet 16 film entry at the Student Television Network Convention in Orlando, Fla. on Thursday. Thirteen KCBY staff members and adviser Irma Kennedy are in Orlando for the convention, which runs through Sunday, at the Rosen Plaza Hotel and Orange County Convention Center. Photo by Chase Wofford

3:30 session Work Flow: TV news reporter Stephanie Bertini
Our passion is what unites us, regardless of what you do as a journalist
Love the whole process and every step of getting there. Don’t just love the story
To be effective, you have to understand how to juggle and which deadlines can be moved and which ones cannot
To work in the business, it’s a lifestyle. You juggle many different things. Know what to prioritize
If you are working on a story and breaking news happens, quickly transition to the breaking news and be able to come back to your daily
Work flow is ongoing and continuous
Awards are the fruits of consistent and diligent workflow. You have to work to get the results. Awards are not luck
Impeccable quality can never be compromised. Nobody can ever beat an accurate, beautiful story
The more people you observe, the more people you talk to, that will help you with your workflow
Everything we do is for that next story. It’s an ongoing process
Much of what you get to tell your story comes from off camera interviews
A typical reporter’s day cannot be defined. It’s constantly changing
But always trying to understand your community, state, country and world. Always talking to sources – these are the bones of the day. The rest is always changing
Nobody hands you an investigation. You have to be the investigator
Understand everyone’s motivator – such as, why would an illegal immigrant come to his country? Those motivators tell you a lot about their story.
Important to know your student’s motivators: why do they want to be a reporter? What’s their motivator?
Every story you do is part of your mosaic
As a journalist, the little interview can get you the big interview eve if they are not related. Every question you ask and everything you write is part of your arsenal
Deadlines: if something is important enough to you, you will do what to takes to make it happen
You are a reporter for your brand. You will do whatever your TV station/newspaper asks of you and respect what they ask you to do, but If you work to represent yourself, you will never miss a deadline
Don’t read your questions for where you wrote them down – who talks like that to people? Commit to an interview and not just questions. You want a story
Always look for the impact with your story – what’s the most important thing? Don’t waste time on old news with your story
With experience, you learn to figure out the angle of your story that connects to your audience. Often, it’s the part of the story that hits you in the gut. If it hits you in that gut, more than likely it will create the same feeling with your audience
Our job is not to worry about how the person feels about talking about the topic. Our job is to tell the story. We cannot care about the person feels. We have to care about how our audience feels
Elected officials put themselves there and have to take the good and the bad. We cannot worry about how they feel
Coppell High School's KCBY students attending the 2014 Student Television Network Convention spent their last day in Orlando, Fla. participating in the Disney Youth Education Series program at Epcot.

Coppell High School’s KCBY students attending the 2014 Student Television Network Convention spent their last day in Orlando, Fla. participating in the Disney Youth Education Series program at Epcot. The workshop focused on storytelling through photography. Photo by Chase Wofford

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